Parachute Test For Starliner Brings Boeing And NASA Closer

A successful test conducted by NASA proves that private industries will soon be able to get in on scientific and space research. Boeing has been developing the Starliner, which can transport astronauts to and from the International Space Station, safely. The test which was conducted in New Mexico proved the safety and design of Starliner parachutes.

In the video below, you see the boilerplate of a Boeing CST-100 Starliner being lifted off the ground by a 1.3-million-cubic-foot helium balloon. After reaching 38,000 feet -which is typical for a commercial flight- the boilerplate detached from the helium balloon. The vehicle then begins to fall into the desert at 300 miles per hour. When the boilerplate reaches 28,000 feet two drogue parachutes deploy, slowing its descent dramatically. Once it hits 12,000 feet, the main parachute deploys, allowing the vehicle to settle down into the desert sand.

Watch the parachute test carried out here:

Video Credits: NASAKennedy via YouTube

The parachute test was carried out in the San Andres mountains of New Mexico in February. This test provides a preview of the relationship between Boeing and NASA, say sources from NASA Kennedy.

NASA’s CCP spacecraft systems lead, Mark Biesack said:

Completion of this test campaign will bring Boeing and NASA one step closer to launching astronauts on an American vehicle and bringing them home safely.

The Starliner spacecraft will launch on an Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

Seen from the top hatch of the Starliner boilerplate, parachutes deploy as planned to land the boilerplate safely during a test of the parachute system. Credits: Boeing
Seen from the top hatch of the Starliner boilerplate, parachutes deploy as planned to land the boilerplate safely during a test of the parachute system.
Credits: Boeing